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Mental Health: Disorders, Coping, & Healthy Habits: Eating Disorders

Spreading awareness of mental health issues

Definition

What is an Eating Disorder?

Books

Living FULL

Winning My Battle With Eating DisordersFinding My FULL: This is my journey from starving to letting myself be FULL-physically & emotionally. What is living a FULL life? Having anorexia, bulimia, or vacillating between the two, you are trying to achieve an empty feeling through starvation or purging. Living a FULL life is a life where you aren't starving anymore?starving for acceptance and love from others and yourself. It's a life where you are feeding your mind and soul with good thoughts and foods. A life without your eating disorder. Victim of the eating disorder monster: Imagine waking in a hospital bed to find your frail, pale arm punctured by an IV transferring fluids and nutrients into your weak, stiff body. What happened? You're an adult, age twenty-six, and you just had a seizure precipitated by your chronic, secretive, decades-long struggle with unacknowledged eating disorders. You have no friends and no normal young-adult experiences. Living FULL is written by Danielle Sherman-Lazar, a woman who passed through the eating disorder crucible to recovery, sharing the most intimate and shameful details of her mental illness. Living FULL is Danielle's story. Hidden out of shame: Eating disorders in young adults are hardly talked about, but are pervasive. Eating disorders are kept hidden out of shame. A groundbreaking 2012 study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders found that about 13 percent of women over age 50 exhibit eating disorder symptoms. 

Preventing Eating Disorders among Pre-Teen Girls

A must for parents, teachers and counselors, this book targets preadolescent girls aiming to engage them in educational activites that will empower them to avoid eating disorders. The author examines eating disorders from sociocultural and feminist perspectives showing how disorders are most often caused by overexposure to media messages, an unrealistic cultural fascination with thinness, by continuous anaylsis of our bodies and a disordered cultural view of food. Then Menassa presents a 10-session guide to prevention that engages girls in activities to spur and empower their independent thinking and reasoning. For example, girls become watchdogs of the media and write to companies that present women in a negative light in their advertisements. The girls challenge ingrained beliefs and replace them with healthier ones. Preadolescence is a time when girls' minds are malleable and they are willing to challenge established activities, such as media presentations. Once girls hit puberty, many will have already developed disordered eating behaviors; many will have been on several diets; therefore, beginning the work to decode and combat harmful messages before that stage is crucial.

Midlife Eating Disorders

In most people's minds, "eating disorder" (ED) conjures images of a thin, white, upper-middle-class teenage girl. The ED landscape has changed. Countless men and women in midlife and beyond, from all ethnic backgrounds, also struggle with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, purging disorder, and binge eating disorder. Some people have suffered since youth; others relapsed in midlife, often after a stressor such as infidelity, divorce, death of a loved one, menopause, or unemployment. Still others experience eating disorder symptoms for the first time in midlife. Primary care physicians, ob-gyns, and other practitioners may overlook these disorders in adults or, even worse, demean them for not having outgrown these adolescent problems. Treatments for adults must acknowledge and address the unique challenges faced by those middle-aged or older.Midlife Eating Disorders-a landmark book-guides adults in understanding "Why me?" and "Why now?" It shows a connection between the rise in midlife ED and certain industries that foster discontent with the natural aging process. It also gives readers renewed hope by explaining how to overcome symptoms and access resources and support. Renowned eating disorder specialist Cynthia M. Bulik, Ph.D., helps partners and family members develop compassion for those who suffer with ED-and helps health professionals appreciatethe nuances associated with detecting and treating midlife eating disorders.

Gaining

In 1979, Liu penned the groundbreaking memoir Solitaire, in which she described her battle with anorexia. Now, three decades later, Liu shares her story and those of her peers who are still struggling to understand the role anorexia and bulimia have played in their lives.

Dying to Be Beautiful

This book offers a ladder out of the black hole of food fixations. The author reviews the standard therapies and includes appendices on books and treatment resources. But it is the detailed, heart-rending stories of struggle and triumph --including Schwirzer's own-- that lift the heart.

Web Resources

Eating Disorder