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Anti-Racism: Latinx Experience

This guide contains information on resources relating to anti-racism, including recommended books for further reading and films.

Oral Histories

I'm Mexican.

Perspectives

Crux

A daughter's quest to understand her charismatic and troubled father, an immigrant who crosses borders both real and illusory--between sanity and madness, science and spirituality, life and death Winner of the PEN/FUSION Emerging Writers Prize * "Expressive and affecting . . . deeply researched and tightly written . . . Crux, at its heart, is [Jean] Guerrero's love letter to her dad."--NPR Throughout Jean Guerrero's childhood, her father, Marco Antonio, was an erratic and elusive presence. A self-taught genius at fixing, creating, and conjuring things--and capable of transforming himself into a shaman, dreamcaster, or animal whisperer in his enchanted daughter's eyes--he gradually began to lose himself in his peculiar obsessions, careening wildly between reality and hallucination. In time, he fled his family and responsibilities--to Asia, Europe, and eventually back to Mexico. He succumbed to drug- and alcohol-fueled manias, while suffering the effects of what he said were CIA mind-control experiments. As soon as she was old enough, Jean set out after him. Now a journalist, she used the tools of her trade, hoping to find answers to the questions he left behind. In this lyrical, haunting memoir, Jean Guerrero tries to locate the border between truth and fantasy as she searches for explanations for her father's behavior. Refusing to accept an alleged schizophrenia diagnosis at face value, she takes Marco Antonio's dark paranoia seriously and investigates all his wildest claims. She crisscrosses the Mexican-American border to unearth the stories of cousins and grandparents and discovers a chain of fabulists and mystics in her lineage, going back to her great-great-grandmother, a clairvoyant curandera who was paid to summon spirits from the afterlife. As she delves deeper and deeper into her family's shadowy past, Jean begins mirroring her father's self-destructive behavior. She risks death on her adventures, imperiling everything in her journey to redeem her father from the underworld of his delusions. In the tradition of engrossing family memoirs like The Liar's Club and The Glass Castle, Crux is both a riveting adventure story and a profoundly original exploration of the human psyche, the mysteries of our most intimate relationships--and ourselves. "[Guerrero] writes poetically about borders as a metaphor for the boundary of identity between father and daughter and the porous connective tissues that bind them."--The National Book Review

The Undocumented Americans

Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name. It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she'd tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell.  So she wrote her immigration lawyer's phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrants--and to find the hidden key to her own.    Looking beyond the flashpoints of the border or the activism of the DREAMers, Cornejo Villavicencio explores the lives of the undocumented--and the mysteries of her own life. She finds the singular, effervescent characters across the nation often reduced in the media to political pawns or nameless laborers. The stories she tells are not deferential or naively inspirational but show the love, magic, heartbreak, insanity, and vulgarity that infuse the day-to-day lives of her subjects.    In New York, we meet the undocumented workers who were recruited into the federally funded Ground Zero cleanup after 9/11. In Miami, we enter the ubiquitous botanicas, which offer medicinal herbs and potions to those whose status blocks them from any other healthcare options. In Flint, Michigan, we learn of demands for state ID in order to receive life-saving clean water. In Connecticut, Cornejo Villavicencio, childless by choice, finds family in two teenage girls whose father is in sanctuary. And through it all we see the author grappling with the biggest questions of love, duty, family, and survival.    In her incandescent, relentlessly probing voice, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio combines sensitive reporting and powerful personal narratives to bring to light remarkable stories of resilience, madness, and death. Through these stories we come to understand what it truly means to be a stray. An expendable. A hero. An American.

Latinos Facing Racism

Feagin and Cobas provide the first in-depth examination of the everyday racism faced by middle-class Latinos. Based on a national survey, we learn how a diverse group of talented Latinos Mexican Americans, Puerto Rican Americans, Cuban Americans, and others respond to and cope with the commonplace white racial framing and discriminatory practices. Drawing on extensive interviewing, the authors address the recurring discrimination of ordinary whites directed against Spanish speakers and individuals with presumed Latino phenotypes. These incidents occur in everyday encounters, such as when male and female Latinos travel or shop. The book also chronicles the mistreatment that Latinos face from immigration officials when they cross US borders and from the police when they are racially profiled outside Latino areas. Critical and conforming Latino responses to recurring white discrimination are also extensively examined, as well as the diverse Latino reactions to remedial programs like affirmative action and to the ideal of assimilation into the proverbial US melting pot. "

Being Brown in Dixie

How has the dramatic influx of Latino populations in the US South challenged and changed traditional conceptions of race? Are barriers facing Latinos the same as those confronted by African Americans? The authors of Being Brown in Dixie use the Latino experience of living and working in the South to explore the shifting complexities of race relations. Systematically considering such central issues as hiring, housing, education, and law enforcement, they emphasize the critical social and policy implications for new gateway communities and for our society as a whole.

Latino Peoples in the New America

"Latinos" are the largest group among Americans of color. At 59 million, they constitute nearly a fifth of the US population. Their number has alarmed many in government, other mainstream institutions, and the nativist right who fear the white-majority US they have known is disappearing. During the 2016 US election and after, Donald Trump has played on these fears, embracing xenophobic messages vilifying many Latin American immigrants as rapists, drug smugglers, or "gang bangers." Many share such nativist desires to build enhanced border walls and create immigration restrictions to keep Latinos of various backgrounds out. Many whites' racist framing has also cast native-born Latinos, their language, and culture in an unfavorable light. Trump and his followers' attacks provide a peek at the complex phenomenon of the racialization of US Latinos. This volume explores an array of racialization's manifestations, including white mob violence, profiling by law enforcement, political disenfranchisement, whitewashed reinterpretations of Latino history and culture, and depictions of "good Latinos" as racially subservient. But subservience has never marked the Latino community, and this book includes pointed discussions of Latino resistance to racism. Additionally, the book's scope goes beyond the United States, revealing how Latinos are racialized in yet other societies.

Neither Enemies nor Friends

In this collection, leading scholars focus on the contemporary meanings and diverse experiences of blackness in specific countries of the hemisphere, including the United States. The anthology introduces new perspectives on comparative forms of racialization in the Americas and presents its implications both for Latin American societies, and for Latinos' relations with African Americans in the U.S.

Latino Poverty in the New Century

Understand the social factors that challenge this fast-growing community The Latino community will soon be the largest minority population in the United States. Although Hispanics have been part of the American scene since before independence, their issues have only recently drawn the attention of the mainstream. Latino Poverty in the New Century takes a clear look at the reasons why poverty and inequality are still major concerns for Hispanic citizens and residents. This keen analysis examines how apparently neutral, even well-meaning social and educational policies can have a devastating effect. The interlocking consequences of language problems, educational problems, gangs, poverty, and illness become a vicious cycle. Despite pervasive patterns of discrimination and subtle barriers to achievement, the Latino community still displays its power. Latino Poverty in the New Century reveals how a faith-based community organization succeeded in adapting indigenous networks and culturally relevant sources of support and power to create a strong community presence.Latino Poverty in the New Century offers a rich, detailed analysis of the challenges that face Hispanics in the United States: the implications of US immigration policy for immigrants, refugees, and native-born Latino citizens the language barriers that can prevent Latinos from full participation in both society and educational programs health care policies and the sometimes tragic consequences of the lack of medical insurance the role of extracurricular activities in keeping Latino students in school the twin calamities known as gentrification and urban blightThis comprehensive book provides social workers and policymakers with wide-ranging analyses of some of the pressing issues and social policies that affect Hispanics in the United States. Latino Poverty in the New Century explores ways to keep Latino youth in high school, promote community organization, encourage Latinos to vote, and increase your understanding of migration dynamics. Containing current research and case studies, this valuable book will help you comprehend the challenges that Latinos face in this country and respect the gains they have made in spite of the obstacles in their way.

Latina Bilingual Education Teachers

Using critical race theory and whiteness studies as theoretical frameworks, this book traces two Latina bilingual education teachers in three different professional phases: as paraprofessionals, teacher candidates, and certified teachers. Grounded in a longitudinal case study, this book sheds light on the effects of institutional racism when Latina/o educational professionals attempt inclusion in white dominant organizations, such as schools. Revealing and analyzing the structural racism present in schools and the obstacles it creates for professionals of color, the author exposes the racist practices that are hidden from view and offer practical solutions to combat them.

Ignored Racism

Although Latinos are now the largest non-majority group in the United States, existing research on white attitudes toward Latinos has focused almost exclusively on attitudes toward immigration. This book changes that. It argues that such accounts fundamentally underestimate the political power of whites' animus toward Latinos and thus miss how conflict extends well beyond immigration to issues such as voting rights, criminal punishment, policing, and which candidates to support. Providing historical and cultural context and drawing on rich survey and experimental evidence, the authors show that Latino racism-ethnicism is a coherent belief system about Latinos that is conceptually and empirically distinct from other forms of out-group hostility, and from partisanship and ideology. Moreover, animus toward Latinos has become a powerful force in contemporary American politics, shaping white public opinion in elections and across a number of important issue areas - and resulting in policies that harm Latinos disproportionately.

Stolen Education