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Google & Google Scholar: Google

Google is a powerful search engine that offers quick and easy web searching. Use the tips and tricks provided in this guide to get the most your of your Google search.

Google

Google is a powerful search engine that offers quick and easy web searching. Use the tips and tricks provided in this guide to get the most your of your Google search.

Things to keep in mind:

  • Google itself only holds roughly 4% of available content. The rest is available through paid subscriptions, like what is available at McKee Library.
  • When in doubt, always carefully evaluate web resources, see link below, before using any source in your academic writing.
  • Google Scholar offers some options for refining your results. Using library databases is often the best method for locating scholarly sources.

Resources & Links

Perspectives

How Google Works

Seasoned Google executives Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg provide an insider's guide to Google, from its business history and disruptive corporate strategy to developing a new managment philosophy and creating a corporate culture where innovation and creativity thrive. Seasoned Google executives Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg provide an insider's guide to Google, from its business history and disruptive corporate strategy to developing a new managment philosophy and creating a corporate culture where innovation and creativity thrive. Google Executive Chairman and ex-CEO Eric Schmidt and former SVP of Products Jonathan Rosenberg came to Google over a decade ago as proven technology executives. At the time, the company was already well-known for doing things differently, reflecting the visionary-and frequently contrarian-principles of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. If Eric and Jonathan were going to succeed, they realized they would have to relearn everything they thought they knew about management and business. Today, Google is a global icon that regularly pushes the boundaries of innovation in a variety of fields. How Google Works is an entertaining, page-turning primer containing lessons that Eric and Jonathan learned as they helped build the company. The authors explain how technology has shifted the balance of power from companies to consumers, and that the only way to succeed in this ever-changing landscape is to create superior products and attract a new breed of multifaceted employees whom Eric and Jonathan dub "smart creatives." Covering topics including corporate culture, strategy, talent, decision-making, communication, innovation, and dealing with disruption, the authors illustrate management maxims ("Consensus requires dissension," "Exile knaves but fight for divas," "Think 10X, not 10%") with numerous insider anecdotes from Google's history, many of which are shared here for the first time. In an era when everything is speeding up, the best way for businesses to succeed is to attract smart-creative people and give them an environment where they can thrive at scale. How Google Works explains how to do just that.

Google

Google is the planet's most popular program for finding stuff on the Web. Millions of people a day use it to search for everything from apple pie recipes to high school sweethearts to Zimbabwean bus schedules--but it has no manual.And who needs help for such an easy to use program? As it turns out, Google has many hidden tricks and tools that can turn your simple searching into powerful--and successful--discoveries. But you have to know where to look. Google: The Missing Manual is your guide, covering: Search techniques and tricks. If you know which search words to choose and how to ask for the special things Google lets you look for--like phone numbers, definitions, stock quotes, pictures, and other goodies--you'll get more of what you want, more often. This book helps you search more effectively. Must-have tools. Why head to Google's home page 80 times a day when toolbars, buttons and other widgets can help you search more efficiently? Use this book to find out how the pros achieve greater Google efficiency. Little-known corners of Google. From the "Similar pages" links in your Google results to the mysterious Groups and Directory tabs on the home page, down-to-earth discussions throughout this book explain what these odd items are and when you should use them. Whether you're new to the Web or an Internet aficionado, Google: The Missing Manual is a friendly deskside companion, brimming with tips for getting more out of the world's favorite search program.

Google Hacks

The Internet puts a wealth of information at your fingertips, and all you have to know is how to find it. Google is your ultimate research tool--a search engine that indexes more than 2.4 billion web pages, in more than 30 languages, conducting more than 150 million searches a day. The more you know about Google, the better you are at pulling data off the Web. You've got a cadre of techniques up your sleeve--tricks you've learned from practice, from exchanging ideas with others, and from plain old trial and error--but you're always looking for better ways to search. It's the "hacker" in you: not the troublemaking kind, but the kind who really drives innovation by trying new ways to get things done. If this is you, then you'll find new inspiration (and valuable tools, too) in Google Hacks from O'Reilly's new Hacks Series. Google Hacks is a collection of industrial-strength, real-world, tested solutions to practical problems. The book offers a variety of interesting ways for power users to mine the enormous amount of information that Google has access to, and helps you have fun while doing it. You'll learn clever and powerful methods for using the advanced search interface and the new Google API, including how to build and modify scripts that can become custom business applications based on Google. Google Hacks contains 100 tips, tricks and scripts that you can use to become instantly more effective in your research. Each hack can be read in just a few minutes, but can save hours of searching for the right answers. Written by experts for intelligent, advanced users, O'Reilly's new Hacks Series have begun to reclaim the term "hacking" for the good guys. In recent years the term "hacker" has come to be associated with those nefarious black hats who break into other people's computers to snoop, steal information, or disrupt Internet traffic. But the term originally had a much more benign meaning, and you'll still hear it used this way whenever developers get together. Our new Hacks Series is written in the spirit of true hackers--the people who drive innovation. If you're a Google power user, you'll find the technical edge you're looking for in Google Hacks.

Google and the Myth of Universal Knowledge

The recent announcement that Google will digitize the holdings of several major libraries sent shock waves through the book industry and academe. Google presented this digital repository as a first step towards a long-dreamed-of universal library, but skeptics were quick to raise a number of concerns about the potential for copyright infringement and unanticipated effects on the business of research and publishing.  Jean-Noël Jeanneney, president of France's Bibliothèque Nationale, here takes aim at what he sees as a far more troubling aspect of Google's Library Project: its potential to misrepresent--and even damage--the world's cultural heritage. In this impassioned work, Jeanneney argues that Google's unsystematic digitization of books from a few partner libraries and its reliance on works written mostly in English constitute acts of selection that can only extend the dominance of American culture abroad. This danger is made evident by a Google book search the author discusses here--one run on Hugo, Cervantes, Dante, and Goethe that resulted in just one non-English edition, and a German translation of Hugo at that. An archive that can so easily slight the masters of European literature--and whose development is driven by commercial interests--cannot provide the foundation for a universal library.  As a leading librarian, Jeanneney remains enthusiastic about the archival potential of the Web. But he argues that the short-term thinking characterized by Google's digital repository must be countered by long-term planning on the part of cultural and governmental institutions worldwide--a serious effort to create a truly comprehensive library, one based on the politics of inclusion and multiculturalism. 

Google It

Think. Invent. Organize. Share. Don't be evil. And change the world.Larry Page and Sergey Brin started out as two Stanford college students with a wild idea: They were going to organize the world's information. From that one deceptively simple goal, they created one of the most influential and innovative companies in the world. The word "google" has even entered our vocabulary as a verb. Now, find out the true history of Google--from its humble beginnings as a thesis project made out of "borrowed" hardware and discount toys through its revolution of the world's relationship with technology to a brief glimpse of where they might take us next. Award-winning investigative reporter Anna Redding shares an inspiring story of innovation, personal and intellectual bravery, and most importantly, of shooting for the moon in order to change the world.